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EcoEnergizer/Nano Energizer Mileage Tests

 

 

I was given a sample bottle of this multi-level-marketed fuel additive and asked to test it out for possible inclusion into our Hydrogen Boost system.  This fuel additive is featured at http://www.ecoenergizer.com.  As some may know we have been looking for some time for an effective fuel additive, if there is one, to add to our system.  We have previously reported on BioPerformance pills, and Ethos Fuel Reformer, with negative or neutral results.  We are still looking for a good effective fuel additive.

 

In preparation for the mileage test with Nano Energizer I did a baseline test with the new winter tires I had just installed.  My normal summer tires at 50 psi consistently gave me 40 mpg but I had no previous data on the new winter tires at 30 psi.  I Used the Scanguage set on trip mpg to calculate the mileage on a typical 30 mile route that I take twice a week, which includes a 10 mile route I takes even more often.  Bot the 10 mile course and the 30 mile course had several checkpoints where the elevation was the same so I could get interim mileage readings.  This way I had no extra miles to drive to get an accurate comparison of mileage with and without the fuel additive.  On the baseline test, which was on a fairly warm Saturday Morning, I achieve 38.2 mpg at the 10 mile point and 37.5 mpg at the 30 mile point.  Both of these point are also at the save elevation.  From my baseline mileage test I determined that my winter tires, as expected, gave me a 5% loss in mileage compared to my summer tires at 50 psi.

 

After doing the baseline at a steady 70 mph I refilled my tank after adding the appropriate amount of fuel additive.  My return trip that day was very encouraging because we achieved 41.4 mpg over the same distance but in the opposite direction.  Of course this was not a scientific test because we made no notice of the wind speed and direction.  Over the next two weeks I recorded the following mpgs on the various courses in same (+) and opposite (-) directions, noting the weather conditions:

 

10 mile +      10 mile -      30 mile +      30 mile –      conditions

38.2                                37.5                                Baseline warm day

                                                          41.4             warm*

                                      40.4             40.2             cool evening with lights

                                      36.1             36.0             wet road light rain day

38.1             34.7                                                    day wet no rain

37.3             39.4                                                    day dry

38.5             38.6                                                    day dry

                                      39.8             39.7             warm day same as baseline

*I believe this indicates we had a tail wind on the return trip and a head wind on the baseline trip.  Wind conditions were noticed to be fairly calm on all tests except baseline. 

 

Average 30 mile mileage with fuel additive 38.7 mpg

Average 10 mile mileage with fuel additive 37.8 mpg

Average baseline mileage 37.85 or 39.45 depending on whether the assumed wind conditions on the baseline tests are considered.

 

Conclusions:

 

          Though the baseline mileage test was not done on a round trip, I concluded that the true round trip baseline figure would have been the average of the out and back mileages recorded that day (37.5 and 41.4)  On this test track every other out and back tests done in calm conditions were quite consistent in both directions, so a baseline figure of 39.45 is consistent with the results of the other out and back tests. 

          If 39.45 mpg is used as a baseline then 38.7 mpg and 37.8 mpg results would indicate a decrease in mileage when using the fuel additive of 2% and 4% decrease.

          If the lower, out direction only, baseline mileage test results of 37.5 is used for comparison, the 38.7 mpg average of 30 mile tests would represent only a 3% increase in mileage but on the 10 mile tests there was a 1% decrease in mileage.

          The variance in mileage due to cool versus warm and dry versus wet weather (no rain), a variance of 10% between the 36 mpg and the 40 mpg, indicates that the change in weather made much more difference in mileage that did the use of fuel additive.

          Whether the fuel additive gave a 2%-4% decrease in mileage or whether is gave a 1% decrease to 3% increase in mileage, depending on which baseline number you use, I would not bother to use it even if it was free, just because of the extra hassle of measuring it and getting it into the fuel tank and mixed with the fuel.  When you consider the cost of the fuel additive, retail price of $100 for a bottle that will treat 1000 gallons, or $0.10 per gallon treated, if you don’t get at least a 5% increase in mileage you’ll be losing money.

 

Recommendation:  Keep looking for an inexpensive effective fuel additive.  Don’t buy Ethos Fuel Reformer, don’t buy BioPerformance pills, and don’t buy Nano Energizer.

 

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